New recipes

Poblano Turkey Quiche

Poblano Turkey Quiche


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

In a large skillet over medium heat, melt the butter. Then, sauté the green onions and peppers until tender, about 3 minutes. Stir in the cilantro.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs and milk; add the flour, baking powder, and salt, and continue whisking until smooth. Stir in the cooked vegetables, the turkey, and about 2/3 cup of the cheese. Pour into the prepared pie plate. Top with tomato slices, sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper, then top with the remaining shredded cheese. Bake until the top is golden brown, 45 minutes to 1 hour.


Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche — Revised and Refined

My first low-carb crustless quiche was this Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche I originally made January 13. After cycling through several other quiches and refining my techniques, I made it again last night with a few key revisions.

It comes out of the pan beautifully and holds up very well on the plate, as if encrusted by something other than the butter I used to coat the pie pan.

The key to a great quiche is the custard — the combination of eggs and milk or cream. I first started by using Julia Child’s “master recipe” from Julia’s Kitchen Wisdom to determine the proportion for the custard: 3 eggs plus enough cream/milk to make 1 1/2 cups. In my case, that worked out to be 3 eggs and 3/4 cup of cream. Over time, I have refined that proportion to be 2 eggs and 1/4 cup of egg beaters with no loss in flavor or texture. I have also increased the heavy cream to 1 cup.

Mark Bittman had a cheese quiche recipe in How to Cook Everything that had 6 eggs and 2 cups of liquid to 2 cups of cheese. I halved that to 1 cup and it still felt like a ton of cheese, which is lovely.

The first time, I roasted the peppers directly on the gas stove, which was fun, but probably less effective than oven roasting. I read about the technique on Serious Eats. This time, I used Mark Bittman’s technique from How to Cook Everything: 30 minutes at 500º turning frequently. Since my experiments with this recipe always include some not so perfect decisions — do not attempt to roast garlic along with the poblanos. They collapsed into little nubs of carbon.

My other big addition is the caramelized onions, which now are a part of every quiche I make. They add a wonderful flavor and sweetness that contrasts well with the mild spiciness of the poblanos. A tinier addition, but one I am very pleased with is 1/4 tsp of ancho chile powder. Ancho chiles are roasted, dried poblanos and the addition of this chile powder added a smoky heat that took it from excellent to sublime.

Optional ingredients can include crumbled turkey or pork chorizo, veggie sausage patties or links, chopped tomatoes, roasted red peppers, or anything your heart desires. Quiche is the easiest dish to make and I always have at least one on hand at all times.

Nutrition Information: For 8 servings, each slice contains: 156 calories and 3.65 net carbs. For 6 servings, each slice contains: 208.5 calories and 4.87 net carbs.


Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche — Revised and Refined

My first low-carb crustless quiche was this Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche I originally made January 13. After cycling through several other quiches and refining my techniques, I made it again last night with a few key revisions.

It comes out of the pan beautifully and holds up very well on the plate, as if encrusted by something other than the butter I used to coat the pie pan.

The key to a great quiche is the custard — the combination of eggs and milk or cream. I first started by using Julia Child’s “master recipe” from Julia’s Kitchen Wisdom to determine the proportion for the custard: 3 eggs plus enough cream/milk to make 1 1/2 cups. In my case, that worked out to be 3 eggs and 3/4 cup of cream. Over time, I have refined that proportion to be 2 eggs and 1/4 cup of egg beaters with no loss in flavor or texture. I have also increased the heavy cream to 1 cup.

Mark Bittman had a cheese quiche recipe in How to Cook Everything that had 6 eggs and 2 cups of liquid to 2 cups of cheese. I halved that to 1 cup and it still felt like a ton of cheese, which is lovely.

The first time, I roasted the peppers directly on the gas stove, which was fun, but probably less effective than oven roasting. I read about the technique on Serious Eats. This time, I used Mark Bittman’s technique from How to Cook Everything: 30 minutes at 500º turning frequently. Since my experiments with this recipe always include some not so perfect decisions — do not attempt to roast garlic along with the poblanos. They collapsed into little nubs of carbon.

My other big addition is the caramelized onions, which now are a part of every quiche I make. They add a wonderful flavor and sweetness that contrasts well with the mild spiciness of the poblanos. A tinier addition, but one I am very pleased with is 1/4 tsp of ancho chile powder. Ancho chiles are roasted, dried poblanos and the addition of this chile powder added a smoky heat that took it from excellent to sublime.

Optional ingredients can include crumbled turkey or pork chorizo, veggie sausage patties or links, chopped tomatoes, roasted red peppers, or anything your heart desires. Quiche is the easiest dish to make and I always have at least one on hand at all times.

Nutrition Information: For 8 servings, each slice contains: 156 calories and 3.65 net carbs. For 6 servings, each slice contains: 208.5 calories and 4.87 net carbs.


Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche — Revised and Refined

My first low-carb crustless quiche was this Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche I originally made January 13. After cycling through several other quiches and refining my techniques, I made it again last night with a few key revisions.

It comes out of the pan beautifully and holds up very well on the plate, as if encrusted by something other than the butter I used to coat the pie pan.

The key to a great quiche is the custard — the combination of eggs and milk or cream. I first started by using Julia Child’s “master recipe” from Julia’s Kitchen Wisdom to determine the proportion for the custard: 3 eggs plus enough cream/milk to make 1 1/2 cups. In my case, that worked out to be 3 eggs and 3/4 cup of cream. Over time, I have refined that proportion to be 2 eggs and 1/4 cup of egg beaters with no loss in flavor or texture. I have also increased the heavy cream to 1 cup.

Mark Bittman had a cheese quiche recipe in How to Cook Everything that had 6 eggs and 2 cups of liquid to 2 cups of cheese. I halved that to 1 cup and it still felt like a ton of cheese, which is lovely.

The first time, I roasted the peppers directly on the gas stove, which was fun, but probably less effective than oven roasting. I read about the technique on Serious Eats. This time, I used Mark Bittman’s technique from How to Cook Everything: 30 minutes at 500º turning frequently. Since my experiments with this recipe always include some not so perfect decisions — do not attempt to roast garlic along with the poblanos. They collapsed into little nubs of carbon.

My other big addition is the caramelized onions, which now are a part of every quiche I make. They add a wonderful flavor and sweetness that contrasts well with the mild spiciness of the poblanos. A tinier addition, but one I am very pleased with is 1/4 tsp of ancho chile powder. Ancho chiles are roasted, dried poblanos and the addition of this chile powder added a smoky heat that took it from excellent to sublime.

Optional ingredients can include crumbled turkey or pork chorizo, veggie sausage patties or links, chopped tomatoes, roasted red peppers, or anything your heart desires. Quiche is the easiest dish to make and I always have at least one on hand at all times.

Nutrition Information: For 8 servings, each slice contains: 156 calories and 3.65 net carbs. For 6 servings, each slice contains: 208.5 calories and 4.87 net carbs.


Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche — Revised and Refined

My first low-carb crustless quiche was this Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche I originally made January 13. After cycling through several other quiches and refining my techniques, I made it again last night with a few key revisions.

It comes out of the pan beautifully and holds up very well on the plate, as if encrusted by something other than the butter I used to coat the pie pan.

The key to a great quiche is the custard — the combination of eggs and milk or cream. I first started by using Julia Child’s “master recipe” from Julia’s Kitchen Wisdom to determine the proportion for the custard: 3 eggs plus enough cream/milk to make 1 1/2 cups. In my case, that worked out to be 3 eggs and 3/4 cup of cream. Over time, I have refined that proportion to be 2 eggs and 1/4 cup of egg beaters with no loss in flavor or texture. I have also increased the heavy cream to 1 cup.

Mark Bittman had a cheese quiche recipe in How to Cook Everything that had 6 eggs and 2 cups of liquid to 2 cups of cheese. I halved that to 1 cup and it still felt like a ton of cheese, which is lovely.

The first time, I roasted the peppers directly on the gas stove, which was fun, but probably less effective than oven roasting. I read about the technique on Serious Eats. This time, I used Mark Bittman’s technique from How to Cook Everything: 30 minutes at 500º turning frequently. Since my experiments with this recipe always include some not so perfect decisions — do not attempt to roast garlic along with the poblanos. They collapsed into little nubs of carbon.

My other big addition is the caramelized onions, which now are a part of every quiche I make. They add a wonderful flavor and sweetness that contrasts well with the mild spiciness of the poblanos. A tinier addition, but one I am very pleased with is 1/4 tsp of ancho chile powder. Ancho chiles are roasted, dried poblanos and the addition of this chile powder added a smoky heat that took it from excellent to sublime.

Optional ingredients can include crumbled turkey or pork chorizo, veggie sausage patties or links, chopped tomatoes, roasted red peppers, or anything your heart desires. Quiche is the easiest dish to make and I always have at least one on hand at all times.

Nutrition Information: For 8 servings, each slice contains: 156 calories and 3.65 net carbs. For 6 servings, each slice contains: 208.5 calories and 4.87 net carbs.


Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche — Revised and Refined

My first low-carb crustless quiche was this Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche I originally made January 13. After cycling through several other quiches and refining my techniques, I made it again last night with a few key revisions.

It comes out of the pan beautifully and holds up very well on the plate, as if encrusted by something other than the butter I used to coat the pie pan.

The key to a great quiche is the custard — the combination of eggs and milk or cream. I first started by using Julia Child’s “master recipe” from Julia’s Kitchen Wisdom to determine the proportion for the custard: 3 eggs plus enough cream/milk to make 1 1/2 cups. In my case, that worked out to be 3 eggs and 3/4 cup of cream. Over time, I have refined that proportion to be 2 eggs and 1/4 cup of egg beaters with no loss in flavor or texture. I have also increased the heavy cream to 1 cup.

Mark Bittman had a cheese quiche recipe in How to Cook Everything that had 6 eggs and 2 cups of liquid to 2 cups of cheese. I halved that to 1 cup and it still felt like a ton of cheese, which is lovely.

The first time, I roasted the peppers directly on the gas stove, which was fun, but probably less effective than oven roasting. I read about the technique on Serious Eats. This time, I used Mark Bittman’s technique from How to Cook Everything: 30 minutes at 500º turning frequently. Since my experiments with this recipe always include some not so perfect decisions — do not attempt to roast garlic along with the poblanos. They collapsed into little nubs of carbon.

My other big addition is the caramelized onions, which now are a part of every quiche I make. They add a wonderful flavor and sweetness that contrasts well with the mild spiciness of the poblanos. A tinier addition, but one I am very pleased with is 1/4 tsp of ancho chile powder. Ancho chiles are roasted, dried poblanos and the addition of this chile powder added a smoky heat that took it from excellent to sublime.

Optional ingredients can include crumbled turkey or pork chorizo, veggie sausage patties or links, chopped tomatoes, roasted red peppers, or anything your heart desires. Quiche is the easiest dish to make and I always have at least one on hand at all times.

Nutrition Information: For 8 servings, each slice contains: 156 calories and 3.65 net carbs. For 6 servings, each slice contains: 208.5 calories and 4.87 net carbs.


Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche — Revised and Refined

My first low-carb crustless quiche was this Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche I originally made January 13. After cycling through several other quiches and refining my techniques, I made it again last night with a few key revisions.

It comes out of the pan beautifully and holds up very well on the plate, as if encrusted by something other than the butter I used to coat the pie pan.

The key to a great quiche is the custard — the combination of eggs and milk or cream. I first started by using Julia Child’s “master recipe” from Julia’s Kitchen Wisdom to determine the proportion for the custard: 3 eggs plus enough cream/milk to make 1 1/2 cups. In my case, that worked out to be 3 eggs and 3/4 cup of cream. Over time, I have refined that proportion to be 2 eggs and 1/4 cup of egg beaters with no loss in flavor or texture. I have also increased the heavy cream to 1 cup.

Mark Bittman had a cheese quiche recipe in How to Cook Everything that had 6 eggs and 2 cups of liquid to 2 cups of cheese. I halved that to 1 cup and it still felt like a ton of cheese, which is lovely.

The first time, I roasted the peppers directly on the gas stove, which was fun, but probably less effective than oven roasting. I read about the technique on Serious Eats. This time, I used Mark Bittman’s technique from How to Cook Everything: 30 minutes at 500º turning frequently. Since my experiments with this recipe always include some not so perfect decisions — do not attempt to roast garlic along with the poblanos. They collapsed into little nubs of carbon.

My other big addition is the caramelized onions, which now are a part of every quiche I make. They add a wonderful flavor and sweetness that contrasts well with the mild spiciness of the poblanos. A tinier addition, but one I am very pleased with is 1/4 tsp of ancho chile powder. Ancho chiles are roasted, dried poblanos and the addition of this chile powder added a smoky heat that took it from excellent to sublime.

Optional ingredients can include crumbled turkey or pork chorizo, veggie sausage patties or links, chopped tomatoes, roasted red peppers, or anything your heart desires. Quiche is the easiest dish to make and I always have at least one on hand at all times.

Nutrition Information: For 8 servings, each slice contains: 156 calories and 3.65 net carbs. For 6 servings, each slice contains: 208.5 calories and 4.87 net carbs.


Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche — Revised and Refined

My first low-carb crustless quiche was this Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche I originally made January 13. After cycling through several other quiches and refining my techniques, I made it again last night with a few key revisions.

It comes out of the pan beautifully and holds up very well on the plate, as if encrusted by something other than the butter I used to coat the pie pan.

The key to a great quiche is the custard — the combination of eggs and milk or cream. I first started by using Julia Child’s “master recipe” from Julia’s Kitchen Wisdom to determine the proportion for the custard: 3 eggs plus enough cream/milk to make 1 1/2 cups. In my case, that worked out to be 3 eggs and 3/4 cup of cream. Over time, I have refined that proportion to be 2 eggs and 1/4 cup of egg beaters with no loss in flavor or texture. I have also increased the heavy cream to 1 cup.

Mark Bittman had a cheese quiche recipe in How to Cook Everything that had 6 eggs and 2 cups of liquid to 2 cups of cheese. I halved that to 1 cup and it still felt like a ton of cheese, which is lovely.

The first time, I roasted the peppers directly on the gas stove, which was fun, but probably less effective than oven roasting. I read about the technique on Serious Eats. This time, I used Mark Bittman’s technique from How to Cook Everything: 30 minutes at 500º turning frequently. Since my experiments with this recipe always include some not so perfect decisions — do not attempt to roast garlic along with the poblanos. They collapsed into little nubs of carbon.

My other big addition is the caramelized onions, which now are a part of every quiche I make. They add a wonderful flavor and sweetness that contrasts well with the mild spiciness of the poblanos. A tinier addition, but one I am very pleased with is 1/4 tsp of ancho chile powder. Ancho chiles are roasted, dried poblanos and the addition of this chile powder added a smoky heat that took it from excellent to sublime.

Optional ingredients can include crumbled turkey or pork chorizo, veggie sausage patties or links, chopped tomatoes, roasted red peppers, or anything your heart desires. Quiche is the easiest dish to make and I always have at least one on hand at all times.

Nutrition Information: For 8 servings, each slice contains: 156 calories and 3.65 net carbs. For 6 servings, each slice contains: 208.5 calories and 4.87 net carbs.


Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche — Revised and Refined

My first low-carb crustless quiche was this Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche I originally made January 13. After cycling through several other quiches and refining my techniques, I made it again last night with a few key revisions.

It comes out of the pan beautifully and holds up very well on the plate, as if encrusted by something other than the butter I used to coat the pie pan.

The key to a great quiche is the custard — the combination of eggs and milk or cream. I first started by using Julia Child’s “master recipe” from Julia’s Kitchen Wisdom to determine the proportion for the custard: 3 eggs plus enough cream/milk to make 1 1/2 cups. In my case, that worked out to be 3 eggs and 3/4 cup of cream. Over time, I have refined that proportion to be 2 eggs and 1/4 cup of egg beaters with no loss in flavor or texture. I have also increased the heavy cream to 1 cup.

Mark Bittman had a cheese quiche recipe in How to Cook Everything that had 6 eggs and 2 cups of liquid to 2 cups of cheese. I halved that to 1 cup and it still felt like a ton of cheese, which is lovely.

The first time, I roasted the peppers directly on the gas stove, which was fun, but probably less effective than oven roasting. I read about the technique on Serious Eats. This time, I used Mark Bittman’s technique from How to Cook Everything: 30 minutes at 500º turning frequently. Since my experiments with this recipe always include some not so perfect decisions — do not attempt to roast garlic along with the poblanos. They collapsed into little nubs of carbon.

My other big addition is the caramelized onions, which now are a part of every quiche I make. They add a wonderful flavor and sweetness that contrasts well with the mild spiciness of the poblanos. A tinier addition, but one I am very pleased with is 1/4 tsp of ancho chile powder. Ancho chiles are roasted, dried poblanos and the addition of this chile powder added a smoky heat that took it from excellent to sublime.

Optional ingredients can include crumbled turkey or pork chorizo, veggie sausage patties or links, chopped tomatoes, roasted red peppers, or anything your heart desires. Quiche is the easiest dish to make and I always have at least one on hand at all times.

Nutrition Information: For 8 servings, each slice contains: 156 calories and 3.65 net carbs. For 6 servings, each slice contains: 208.5 calories and 4.87 net carbs.


Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche — Revised and Refined

My first low-carb crustless quiche was this Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche I originally made January 13. After cycling through several other quiches and refining my techniques, I made it again last night with a few key revisions.

It comes out of the pan beautifully and holds up very well on the plate, as if encrusted by something other than the butter I used to coat the pie pan.

The key to a great quiche is the custard — the combination of eggs and milk or cream. I first started by using Julia Child’s “master recipe” from Julia’s Kitchen Wisdom to determine the proportion for the custard: 3 eggs plus enough cream/milk to make 1 1/2 cups. In my case, that worked out to be 3 eggs and 3/4 cup of cream. Over time, I have refined that proportion to be 2 eggs and 1/4 cup of egg beaters with no loss in flavor or texture. I have also increased the heavy cream to 1 cup.

Mark Bittman had a cheese quiche recipe in How to Cook Everything that had 6 eggs and 2 cups of liquid to 2 cups of cheese. I halved that to 1 cup and it still felt like a ton of cheese, which is lovely.

The first time, I roasted the peppers directly on the gas stove, which was fun, but probably less effective than oven roasting. I read about the technique on Serious Eats. This time, I used Mark Bittman’s technique from How to Cook Everything: 30 minutes at 500º turning frequently. Since my experiments with this recipe always include some not so perfect decisions — do not attempt to roast garlic along with the poblanos. They collapsed into little nubs of carbon.

My other big addition is the caramelized onions, which now are a part of every quiche I make. They add a wonderful flavor and sweetness that contrasts well with the mild spiciness of the poblanos. A tinier addition, but one I am very pleased with is 1/4 tsp of ancho chile powder. Ancho chiles are roasted, dried poblanos and the addition of this chile powder added a smoky heat that took it from excellent to sublime.

Optional ingredients can include crumbled turkey or pork chorizo, veggie sausage patties or links, chopped tomatoes, roasted red peppers, or anything your heart desires. Quiche is the easiest dish to make and I always have at least one on hand at all times.

Nutrition Information: For 8 servings, each slice contains: 156 calories and 3.65 net carbs. For 6 servings, each slice contains: 208.5 calories and 4.87 net carbs.


Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche — Revised and Refined

My first low-carb crustless quiche was this Roasted Poblano Colby Jack Crustless Quiche I originally made January 13. After cycling through several other quiches and refining my techniques, I made it again last night with a few key revisions.

It comes out of the pan beautifully and holds up very well on the plate, as if encrusted by something other than the butter I used to coat the pie pan.

The key to a great quiche is the custard — the combination of eggs and milk or cream. I first started by using Julia Child’s “master recipe” from Julia’s Kitchen Wisdom to determine the proportion for the custard: 3 eggs plus enough cream/milk to make 1 1/2 cups. In my case, that worked out to be 3 eggs and 3/4 cup of cream. Over time, I have refined that proportion to be 2 eggs and 1/4 cup of egg beaters with no loss in flavor or texture. I have also increased the heavy cream to 1 cup.

Mark Bittman had a cheese quiche recipe in How to Cook Everything that had 6 eggs and 2 cups of liquid to 2 cups of cheese. I halved that to 1 cup and it still felt like a ton of cheese, which is lovely.

The first time, I roasted the peppers directly on the gas stove, which was fun, but probably less effective than oven roasting. I read about the technique on Serious Eats. This time, I used Mark Bittman’s technique from How to Cook Everything: 30 minutes at 500º turning frequently. Since my experiments with this recipe always include some not so perfect decisions — do not attempt to roast garlic along with the poblanos. They collapsed into little nubs of carbon.

My other big addition is the caramelized onions, which now are a part of every quiche I make. They add a wonderful flavor and sweetness that contrasts well with the mild spiciness of the poblanos. A tinier addition, but one I am very pleased with is 1/4 tsp of ancho chile powder. Ancho chiles are roasted, dried poblanos and the addition of this chile powder added a smoky heat that took it from excellent to sublime.

Optional ingredients can include crumbled turkey or pork chorizo, veggie sausage patties or links, chopped tomatoes, roasted red peppers, or anything your heart desires. Quiche is the easiest dish to make and I always have at least one on hand at all times.

Nutrition Information: For 8 servings, each slice contains: 156 calories and 3.65 net carbs. For 6 servings, each slice contains: 208.5 calories and 4.87 net carbs.